Pergamon Museum – Ishtar Gate

abd_a_masoud_berlin

abd_a_masoud_berlin_1

abd_a_masoud_berlin_3

abd_a_masoud_berlin_4
Ishtar Gate
Pergamon Museum – Berlin

Advertisements

12 thoughts on “Pergamon Museum – Ishtar Gate

      1. SwedishInBerlin

        Thank you!! Is it a museum you recommend to visit..? That’s actually the part of “tourist attraction” I miss here in Berlin, but will be here until the end of June so there will be plenty of time..

      2. Abd A. Masoud Post author

        From my side I can say yes I recommend it, if you are interested in the oriental cultural I am sure you will love the place. I visit the museum every time in Berlin. There you will find in addition the Islamic art section.
        Just give it a try you will not regret it.

      3. SwedishInBerlin

        Sounds interesting. I will talk to my friend about it cause we’ve been discussing going to museums quite a lot. Thank you for the advice!

  1. rabirius

    When I visited the Pergamon Museum I felt a bit sad seeing whole temples taking away from their original space and in a museum…
    …having visited some of the original sites (including Pergamon) before, I tried to imagine how it would look like with all the parts that were not lost in time still intact…

    But, nonetheless, what is on display at the Pergamon Museum is really impressive.

    Reply
    1. Abd A. Masoud Post author

      During my visit to the Pergamon Museum I was discussing this point with my wife and it is really confusing if you keep these stones in the desert they will be either stolen, damaged or rot by the weather.
      In such a museum at least I know that they will be protected an will survive few generations.
      As you said it is really impressive and worth the visit

      Reply
  2. خالد محمد خالد

    Many thanks Abd for this post. Your photos show a colossal monument that we do not see anymore back there in Babylonia. Indeed, even the Hanging Gardens are now “low hanging” due to the cannibalization of its building material by the locals. The photos, however, remind me of my visits to the Iraqi Museum in Baghdad. In going around the museum halls, your eye usually looks down, or at least level, at the displays containing the artefacts. That is until you reach the Assyrian period displays. Here you start looking up to the monuments they created. I guess the Assyrians were imperialists who managed to mobilize the manpower that helped create such huge monuments in stone that withstood time and theft. Locals probably saw no use for such huge monuments and left them to the more recent “imperialist” cannibalization. Cannot argue though about how well they have been used in the Western museums.

    Reply
    1. Abd A. Masoud Post author

      Dear Khalid i was happy going through your Blog and I am honured seeing you visiting my page.
      Once visiting such a colossal monumental section in such a fantastic museum I get always a mixture of feelings, and I was discussing this matter or this feeling in a previous post with rabirius.
      I am not sure what is the best solution: to keep the ceramic shards and all things which archaeologist find in desolated forgotten areas in the same place or to people who do not have the awareness of this treasures, or move it to such a places restore it and preserve it to the next generations.
      Maybe today we can say that there is awareness in many countries, in the case of Ishtar Gate we are talking about the year 1899.
      I really can not give a precise answer but I can say that I was feeling humble standing in front of the Gate knowing that hundreds of years ago Nebuchadnezzar was passing through this gate with Amytis of Media to.

      Reply
    1. Abd A. Masoud Post author

      Hi, i was going through your blog very fast and was happy reading these memory posts, the time flies by very fast.
      I am happy that you liked the photos i hope that you can visit the same places another time to see how they changed to there new glance, i wish you a nice day

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s